About me

website picI am currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance (NCGG) at Princeton University. My research focuses on the ways in which international organizations and other aspects of globalization both condition and also create challenges for domestic democratic institutions.

My current book project builds on my dissertation, which combines large-n analysis and an in-depth case study of the European Union to show that international organizations have unintentionally made democratic backsliding more likely in new democracies. This project finds evidence that these organizations contribute to backsliding by simultaneously neglecting to support important democratic institutions other than elections and elites, increasing relative executive power, and limiting domestic policy options via membership requirements. The book manuscript extends this work to consider how other aspects of globalization, such as free trade agreements and international treaties, create challenges for domestic democratic governance, accountability, and legitimacy, and thus further contribute to democratic erosion. Related research extends this work to explore how other aspects of economic globalization, such as trade shocks from low-wage economies, fuel elite polarization and populism in advanced industrialized democracies.

I have previous policy experience with the United States Agency for International Development, where I worked as a Virtual Student Federal Service E-Intern for the Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance Center, and my work has been published in Comparative Political Studies, Governance, the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics, and the Routledge Handbook of Illiberalism.

I completed my Ph.D. in Political Science at Ohio State University. Before coming to Ohio State, I earned my B.A. in International Studies from Rhodes College. I am originally from Memphis, Tennessee.

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